Specializations

The School of Information's master's curriculum offers any number of options for students to craft a concentration or specialization once they have completed their required courses. The following examples offer suggestions for how students might configure their program of study specialization.

Certificates

Two suggested certificate options for students wanting to document specialized coursework:

Coursework Suggestions

Academic Librarianship

A concentration to prepare students for a career as an information specialist in academic environments (post-12th grade) whether in community and junior colleges, four-year liberal arts colleges or technical institutes, colleges and universities with a few graduate programs, or large-scale public and private research universities. The fall 2013 survey of iSchool MS graduates from 2010-2013 revealed that 42% (59/141 respondents to this question) work in academic institutions other than K-12 settings. Despite the recent economic downturn and its ill effects on higher education, this relatively high number of academic librarians is consistent with the results of our 2007 survey of graduates from 2000-2006 which showed that about 1/3 of them worked in similar venues. Students concentrating in this area usually take as many of the reference and other courses below as possible:

Archives and Records Enterprise

Students pursuing a concentration in archival enterprise can select from a recommended group of courses from which they may construct their own specific views of the specialization. The faculty encourages archives students to take courses in history, especially historiography, to support service to their largest constituency. Other students specialize in digital archiving, which they can do by taking a sequence of courses developed for this purpose. Students may also take INF 385S Digital Libraries or any of a sequence of digitization courses:

  • INF 384R: Digital Repositories
  • INF 385R: Survey of Digitization
  • INF 386C: Archives, Records, and Preservation in the Modern World
  • INF 388E: Historical Museums: Context and Practice
  • INF 389C: Archival and Records Enterprise
  • INF 389E: Introduction to Records Management
  • INF 389G: Introduction to Electronic and Digital Records
  • INF 389J: Appraisal and Selection of Records
  • INF 389K: Life Cycle Metadata for Digital Objects
  • INF 389M: Introduction to Issues in Records Information
  • INF 389N: Seminar in Archival Enterprise (topic vary)
  • INF 389R: Introduction to Archival Enterprise I
  • INF 389S: Introduction to Archival Enterprise II
  • INF 392D: Preservation Basics
  • INF 392K: Digital Archiving and Preservation

Digital Libraries

We encourage students interested in a concentration in digital libraries to begin with two digital libraries foundation courses:

Once they have taken the foundation courses, students select at least one (most students choose more) of the following:

  • INF 385E: Information Architecture and Design
  • INF 385U: Digital Media Collections
  • INF 392L: Introduction to Audio Preservation and Reformatting

Other courses useful for digital libraries studies can be selected from the following:

Global Media and Research Analysis

In consultation with their faculty academic advisor, students can tailor their program of study from the courses suggested below:

  • INF 382C: Understanding and Serving Users
  • INF 382P: Competitive Intelligence Resources and Strategies
  • INF 382R: Introduction to Scientific and Technical Data Collections
  • INF 385E: Information Architecture and Design
  • INF 385M: Database Management
  • INF 385Q: Knowledge Management Systems
  • INF 385S: Digital Libraries
  • INF 385T: iSpy: LIS, Espionage, and World of Intelligence Gathering
  • INF 385T: Social Media for Information Specialists
  • INF 385T: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems
  • INF 385W: Security Informatics
  • INF 387T: Information Technology and Work
  • INF 389G: Introduction to Electronic and Digital Records
  • INF 390C: Copyright - Legal and Cultural Perspectives
  • INF 390N.01: Federal Information Policy

Information Retrieval and Search Engines

With their faculty academic advisors, students can tailor their programs of study from the courses suggested below:

  • INF 380P: Introduction to Programming
  • INF 382C: Understanding and Serving Users
  • INF 382P: Competitive Intelligence Resources and Strategies
  • INF 382R: Introduction to Scientific and Technical Data Collections
  • INF 383D: Mathematical Foundations of Information Studies
  • INF 383E: Interpreting Implicit Information on the Web
  • INF 384H: Concepts of Information Retrieval
  • INF 385C: Human-Computer Interaction
  • INF 385E: Information Architecture and Design
  • INF 385G: Advanced Usability
  • INF 385K: Projects in Human-Computer Interaction
  • INF 385M: Database Management
  • INF 385P: Usability
  • INF 385S: Digital Libraries
  • INF 385T: Human Computation and Crowdsourcing

Information Architecture & Design

This suite of courses prepares information professionals to work in the software and product development industries as usability specialists and information architects. Several of these courses also provide hands-on experience in the iSchool’s Information Experience Lab (the IX Lab) so that students are prepared for work in industrial laboratories upon graduation:

Legal Information Services

A concentration in legal information services builds on the following two courses:

  • INF 382H: Legal Information Resources
  • INF 382L: Introduction to Law Librarianship/Legal Informatics

A range of electives are also offered with more specific focii, from legal information services for corporate environments to legal services for government or academic environments. Students choose from the following courses according to their own interests.

  • INF 382D: Introduction to Information Resources and Services
  • INF 382N: Information Resources in Business
  • INF 382P: Competitive Intelligence Resources and Strategies
  • INF 385M: Database Management
  • INF 385Q: Knowledge Management Systems
  • INF 387: Administration: Legal Issues for Libraries
  • INF 387.2: Information Marketing
  • INF 388K.03: Special Libraries
  • INF 389K.06: Law Libraries
  • INF 389E: Introduction to Records Management
  • INF 389G: Introduction to Electronic and Digital Records
  • INF 390C: Copyright: Cultural and Legal
  • INF 390N: Information Policy
  • INF 390N.1: Federal Information Policy
  • INF 390N.2: Advanced Problems in Copyright and Intellectual Property

Preservation Studies

A student wishing to concentrate in preservation can select from among the following courses, with special emphasis on the first three:

  • INF 392E: Technology and Structure of Records Materials
  • INF 392F: Protection and Care of Records Materials
  • INF 392G: Management of Preservation Programs
  • INF 385R: Survey of Digitization
  • INF 385T: Digital Curation
  • INF 386.7: Seminar in History of Library and Information Studies
  • INF 389C: Archival and Records Enterprise
  • INF 389K: Lifecycle Metadata for Digital Objects
  • INF 392L: Introduction to Audio Preservation and Reformatting

In addition, hands-on and practical experience should be gained through participation in a selection of the following classes.

  • INF 389R: Introduction to Archival Enterprise I
  • INF 389S: Introduction to Archival Enterprise II
  • INF 385T: Conservation Lab Techniques for Non-specialists
  • INF 385U: Digital Media Collections
  • INF 388K.5: Rare Book and Special Collections
  • INF 388E: Historical Museums: Context in Practice
  • INF 392M: Advanced Audio Preservation and Reformatting
  • INF 392K: Digital Archiving and Preservation

Public Librarianship

Our students in public librarianship are prepared for the multiple responsibilities of rural and branch libraries as well as for the specialties required in larger settings. The iSchool faculty recommends courses that address public services (e.g., reference, information literacy), access services (e.g., collection development, information organization), and administration.

  • INF 388K.1: Public Libraries
  • INF 380D: Designing Dynamic Web Pages
  • INF 382D: Introduction to Information Resources and Services
  • INF 382G: Information Resources for Children and Young Adults
  • INF 382K: Information Resources in the Health Sciences
  • INF 382L: Information Resources and Services in the Popular Library
  • INF 382N: Information Resources in Business
  • INF 382S: Library Instruction and Information Literacy
  • INF 384C: Organizing Information
  • INF 384D: Collection Management
  • INF 384W: Descriptive Cataloging and Metadata
  • INF 385C: Human Computer Interaction
  • INF 385H: Digital Media Design
  • INF 385M: Database Management
  • INF 387C: Managing Information Organizations.

School Librarianship

Students interested in serving in as librarians in K-12 educational institutions, particularly public schools, must develop competencies to meet the Texas (and other) state requirements for such service. In addition to understanding the many facets of management needed to run a one-professional library, our graduates can serve in any K-12 setting, providing support to the development of general literacy as well as to clients’ information seeking, evaluation, and use.

Dr. Barbara Immroth, director of the iSchool Standard School Certificate Librarian (SSLC) Program, advises these students and carefully reviews their programs of study and other credentials. See the iSchool Web site for more specificity about this programmatic focus (https://www.ischool.utexas.edu/programs/specializations/sslc).

The following courses are among those recommended for these students:

  • INF 382D: Introduction to Information Resources and Services
  • INF 382E: Materials for Children
  • INF 382F: Materials for Young Adults
  • INF 382L: Information Resources and Services in the Popular Library
  • INF 382G: Electronic Resources for Youth
  • INF 382S: Library Instruction and Information Literacy
  • INF 384W: Descriptive Cataloging and Metadata
  • INF 385H: Digital Media Design
  • INF 385M: Database Management
  • INF 388C: School Media Management

Special Librarianship

Special libraries can be of any size and exist in many kinds of organizations, e.g., private corporations, hospitals, governments at all levels, academic institutions, and the like. Special librarians are particularly good at management and customizing information services, collections, and staff members for the particular organizations in which they serve. The iSchool faculty recommends that students interested in special librarianship choose among these courses as available:

  • INF 380D: Designing Dynamic Web Pages
  • INF 382D: Introduction to Information Resources and Services
  • INF 382K: Information Resources in the Health Sciences
  • INF 382N: Information Resources in Business
  • INF 382P: Competitive Intelligence Resources and Strategies
  • INF 382S: Library Instruction and Information Literacy
  • INF 384C: Organizing Information
  • INF 384D: Collection Management
  • INF 385C: Human Computer Interaction
  • INF 385H: Digital Media Design
  • INF 385M: Database Management
  • INF 387C: Managing Information Organizations
  • INF 387T: Information Technology and Work
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